June 22, 2007

Meet “Alli the Alliphant”

Posted in Uncategorized at 6:16 pm by truthman30

Note : This is a non-commercial parody blog and all information/pictures etc are sourced from other websites and blogs. This blog has no commercial affiliation and is purely an information sharing portal.

Note ( all information/pictures etc are sourced from other websites and blogs)

alliphant1.jpg

Check out these articles and youtube videos about alli ..

George Orwell coined the phrase “newspeak” in his 1948 novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984). In the novel, it is described as being “the only language in the world whose vocabulary gets smaller every year.” An example of Orwellian newspeak is the elimination of the word ‘bad’ and replacing it with “ungood.” That sort of thing. Eventually, by eliminating enough words you can make anything sound less “ungood” as exemplified by the slogan “War is Peace.”

Now another well-known British entity — GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) — has applied newspeak principles to direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising. It’s latest promotional video for the over-the-counter diet pill (”treatment”) Alli blatantly replaces all the nasty-sounding Alli side effect terminology — including “Oily Spotting,” “Flatus with Discharge,” “Fecal Urgency,” “Oily Evacuation,” and “Fecal Incontinence”


Feel free to post or comment about your real experiences of alli on this blog….

alli(TM) is a trademark of GlaxoSmithKline. All other trademarks acknowledged

Check out these articles and youtube videos about alli ..

1 Comment »

  1. Benedict said,

    Xenical (orlistat) 120mg has been available OTC in Oz for a while, and when it was allowed to advertised on TV direct to consumers what did they do?

    (Subscription required to access…)
    Roche takes NDPSC to court, and they still haven’t put my comment on their blog yet!?

    Nice going
    Benedict

    Roche takes NDPSC to court

    http://www.pharmainfocus.com.au/news.asp?newsid=1789

    Posted 25 June 2007

    Roche will resume its battle against the Australian HSNational Drugs and
    Poisons Scheduling Committee (NDPSC) and Choice over the advertising ban
    on Xenical (orlistat) by taking the matter to court next month.

    Roche will tell the Federal Court that the committee made the wrong
    decision when it considered evidence from Choice that led to rescinding
    of brand advertising permission for the weight loss drug in February
    this year.

    As a result of the action, the committee will be faced with a dilemma
    when it considers confirming the ban at its meeting next week. It could
    choose to defer consideration until the court case is decided or proceed
    with the confirmation and risk affecting the outcome of the case.

    Choice had complained that the company was targeting young teenagers
    because it had booked commercials during episodes of Australian Idol.
    The Therapeutic Goods Advertising Code’s guidelines prohibit drug
    advertising to people under 18. Choice, in its evidence, also provided
    reports of girls aged as young as 13 and in the healthy weight range,
    asking for Xenical.

    A spokesperson for Roche said the NDPSC’s February decision was against
    the interests of public health and Roche was pursuing its right to
    challenge it via the appropriate channels, but that “further debate and
    discussion should be left to the court”.

    Gordon Renouf, manager of policy and campaigns at Choice, said the
    consumer organisation is continuing to support the NDPSC and the
    advertising ban. He claimed the consumer organisation remained largely
    unfazed.

    Renouf rejected earlier claims by Roche that Choice’s information
    backing the case was simply anecdotal, and said that the organisation
    remained “transparent” in its evidence. “We stand by our evidence in
    accordance with the appropriate research methodologies,” he said, “and
    will be closely monitoring Roche’s actions”.

    Roche managing director Fred Nadjarian branded the NDPSC “nuts” and
    accused it of incompetence following the decision to ban the advertising.


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